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that we are providing incentives, economic incentives for new industries, clean technology, could almost get the justification for funding -- for funding that through hamilton's argue. hamilton makes the argument that we need infrastructure and roads to support manufacturers. he makes the argument that we need the right tax incentives, and that we need a right of work force that is educated. jefferson has the view that the government needs to support manufacturing. now, this becomes the american economic system and influences henry, abraham lincoln, and is the governing philosophy of america's rise in industrialization. herbert hoover, when i got to the commerce building, and why would your name be in the commerce building, the president responsible for the depression, there's a lot of republic for hoover. he was not the best president, but a great commerce secretary. he was the secretary of commerce and under secretary of everything else, and he was working for calvin coolidge, and you know what hoover did? he believed in the american economic system, and he and calvin coolage, the apos
. so, before the mobile phone only to technologies had spread as widely as the mobile phone. no technology has spread as rapidly as the mobile phone. the only other recent one was the transistor radio and before that, it was fired to spread as wildly. so, what is the -- we know what it means in our lives and what smart phones been and all that but what does it mean for the majority of the world's population. it was built highways, communication highways and labor never connected before. in afghanistan we talk about story that you asked about entrepreneurs and was responsible for creating the afghan cell phone company. this is the biggest story in afghanistan and the last ten years. we don't hear about it. why? because the fact that more afghans today have access and know how to read or write, when a decade ago they would have had to walk 700 miles to make a phone call. but that's not a story. what is a story? it is a big story. i would imagine it is something that means a lot to them in terms of their key devotees. but what is even more exciting, you think about when we buil
read or ever went. today this optical character recognition software, this whole technology that was developed initially and refined so that a blind person could read a book is being used in all kinds of settings. we have heard a little bit about the happy trust and that sort of thing. all kinds of waste is being used today. i happen to be excited. but my refresh will braille display with little pens the pop-up in downtown little actuators, it's expensive technology. multiply that by 32. a little bit expensive, and too expensive for a lot of people. so we have developed synthetic speech. it was pretty primitive at first and not particularly easy to understand. it sounded like this. >> chapter one, almost midnight in virginia when the phone rang in the home and two men came out the front door hastily crossing the, very this warm up the driveway onto the deserted road. >> now, if you think that is a pleasant way to read a book -- [laughter] they have been proved it with time. it can now sound like this. >> chapter one, it was almost midnight in virginia late for the farm lands
:an exploration of reverse engineering of the brain. the national medal of technology recipient attempts to determine how the brain works and apply the knowledge to the creation of intelligent michelin's. to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind, . to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind,achines . to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind,. to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind, ingrid wickelgren. >> this is a fascinating book and it is great to be with you. my first question is to try to talk about the main thesis of the book. are you saying that we can basically reverse engineer the human brain, that it is feasible to do that to creates computer mind that is in distinguishable from yours and mine? >> it is feasible. the level of complexity we can handle, i actually describe the basic principles of the neocortex in the book. some people say and i articulate this criticism in the book and respond to it that every one of the hundreds of trillions of connections was placed exactly
between the reader and writer that however that happens when need to encourage it. technology is bringing us someplace else. as long as we keep the artist in our fold in keep readers and writers connected we will be okay. >> directing your energies like continuing the trustee in the preservation of all that means billion don't care whether it's physical or digital. >> and $0.1 the agency that i had, because i hate to speak exclusively, a love affair with the printed word. not on how something was presented, we were very public oriented. so you do everything you possibly can to move into the public domain. that implies you use every conceivable restaurant. we are in the knowledge development and the knowledge dissemination. we do a film. we preserve will books. we help finance the writing of new books. then we try to bring the public in texas to analysis. therefore we are very big into digitization. one of my favorite quotes, the archivist to lexus said particularly in the area of research, many young people, scholars from if it is in on the internet it doesn't exist. that's a fairly aweso
this was not impersonal market forces, this was not technology, this was not globalization. what was happening was american politics and american economics were working against the middle class. people did this. we decided this. if you look at other countries like germany, their middle class is in better shape. they've done better trading against the world, their companies are making money. so a lot of the things we heard that were not impossible, not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster that than ours. there's something wrong inside the american economic and political system, and that's what this book is about. >> host: hedrick smith is the author. thank you for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wo
into the early 21st century, the confidence has given way to doubt. technologically newer forms of travel especially airplanes and rocket-propelled capsules provide the sense of extreme danger that had faded during the relatively safer nineteentnineteent h century. equally, it's now clear that imperialism had smoothed the way from early circumnavigate is under political and social conditions that would be unwise and unjust to perpetuate let alone re-create. above all there is a growing sense of the planet as beginning to fight back or shrug us off. that that was environment the cost of planetary dominatiodominatio n that had begun to haunt us. we live with all three legacies of around the world travel, every emerging fear that the planet could simply shrugged this off, continuing confidence if we might be able to generate technology and political alliances to dominate the planet but doubt that it is always wise to dominate it in that way. is especially apparent that the characteristic confidence of the long 19th century was the shortest of planetary experiences. yet it has been the most d
market equation whether they want to go dig deeper, wider, with over the situation is. and the technology of copper mining is getting better so they can - 312 in bisbee. it gets bad but they knew had to do it in a way that saves them money so it is a constant cycle of boom and bust boom and it is even more pronounced if you go to the mining towns meaning the company towns. and in arizona we have company towns. it's rare to find a company in the united states anymore where they have everything, schools, the bar, hotels, the supermarket, the barbershop so every single person in the town is paid by the line. that is true in the biggest one in the united states is in arizona. it's a company town. and it's a very depressing place to go. maybe about 700,000 tons of copper a year so its huge. i don't know if you noticed the design, but they did a great job. any of your questions? what's that? >> [inaudible] >> yeah, exactly. that's right. so, any other questions? >> i find it really fascinating what you said about the fact they just don't know how to control the fact that they are polluting. do
war and it's particularly true of the navy is it six kind of on a technological point in american history things had been changing for some time. the power comes in and the railroads already expanding across the continent but the application of the large-scale warfare in the civil war is one of the first cases where we see that. now the land war probably arguably at least is the most immediate impact was the shoulder muskett which dramatically extended their range the soldiers could fight and at sea there are a number of similarly important technological changes. obviously there is steam that had been around for a generation or more with the application, the universal both on the blockade and those attempting to run the blockade rifled guns just as muskets in the field armies and the artillery extended their range and accuracy thereby hiding elevating the impact of the war ships over the guns ashore going into the civil war. the general motion was turned guns ashore are going to defeat them afloat every time mainly because they don't sink. but with the new rifle ordinance and expl
install the systems. as a lover of history, i know he would've been talk of this new technology as a way of keeping an accurate record of events for the memoir he planned to write after leaving office. after the bay of pigs, people say he wanted to be able to remember who said what in case they later changed their tune. [laughter] the wonderful thing about this book is that although much of this material has been available, it has not been easily acceptable until now. the original recordings of of varying quality, and it is not always clear who is speaking in meetings. working with our outstanding archivist, historian ed widmer did an extraordinary job. in election season, i find it fascinating to listen to my father talk about what kind of person succeeds in politics. he believed the time for changing, and he was right for the time. it is interesting to apply his standards to the current campaign. he talks about the odds of people with money succeeding in politics and about whether objects come to play. find his standards to today, i know where i come down. i encourage you to make up yo
moved to an area we thought, part two, very big issue. data, technology, and privacy. broca number of debates which include third-party information issues this is a debate. national security of all other issues which is between richardson and couponing. and then we have the einstein. we thought it will be interesting to have a debate about what the new technology is moving forward with his between gen dempsey and paul rosenzweig. and then the communications system law-enforcement act. what's next, susan land out. we are starting with the framework of a week-old legal frameworks for projecting force. we will have to of those debates . to they were going to do cyber warrant attention policies and start off with the tension policies. dry to start off with craig jacobs. and both individuals are quite well known to be, but not to you and the audience. served in several high-profile positions in the government including at the white house to the other partner justice, the department of labor. most recently great served as the third ranking official of the part of labor. in this position
, a technology by developed and i happen to know this is not an 11th century loom or 13. it was the 12th. there might be six people know what to know that, but someone working on the film do it and got that exactly right. that kind of thing is very impressive. >> are you tempted to be in any more of these things? >> i like the clamor. it is a privilege to work with one of the stars and i felt honored and i learned about. i i learned, for example, that she can't act if you're trying to remember your lines because then you say your lines with outlook on your face, what comes. if you're going to ask in a 152nd book you have to know your lines automatically. i do know that before, so i learned a lot. but no, i'm not tempted to do anymore. i'm going to stick to what i'm good at. >> you've got some work ahead of you. how is the third look at the trilogy? >> well, i finished "winter of the world" at christmas so i've been working since then and have completed the outline and has about 100 pages. it starts at the cold war. two events in 1961. one is the building of the berlin wall. i have made g
that development of technology while it is short in distance it did not negate, it made it more important because it opened up a whole new geography and the world trade system cultural and economics flow from the geography because what is culture? it is the accumulated experience of a specific people on may specifically and skate over hundreds of thousands of years that leads to tradition and habits that can be identifiable. one of the places i've always considered to have the most deeply denzel identifiable culture shock is remaining. you know, nobody can admit there's a specific romanian culture that's been formed by the consul let between innovators coming from central europe and those coming from the plateau which has fostered a suspicious negotiation and character they can see right of into the politics in bucharest to this day and i can go to every country, not every but many countries and talk about but. >> talk for a moment about germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so german
's, essentially, a technology of last resort for the internet. you use it if there is no possibility of direct physical can connections. and there are, you know, fewer and fewer places in the world, fewer and fewer countries that do not now have redundant physical connections. that's, you know, most remarkably that's africa. the last two or three years now have seen b six new cables where previously there was only one. so as much as possible people are eager to move away from satellite not only because of the high cost and the relatively low bandwidth, but because of what's known as the latency, the actual time delay in making that 30,000-mile trip to space and back. >> host: so, mr. blum, these centers, 60 hudson avenue, london, etc., ashburn, virginia, are these when it comes to cybersecurity, would these be prime targets? >> guest: no. i don't think they would be. i mean, i take cybersecurity very seriously, but i think the far greater concern is the threat through the networks, not the threat to the physical infrastructure itself. these are buildings that are relatively well secured. they'
on the family property to turn it into a center for radio technology, a meteorology and gave it to the united states government during world war ii. he had one of the greatest collections of coins and stamps. he made a mark. >> one of the things that strikes me about the gilded age, there were wealthy people who believed to give back to society like andrew carnegie. did she donates her money to public service? >> she never did it publicly. of she would not let any suggestion that she had better sun and others have said there were plenty of places and people she gave to. she felt she was hounded constantly getting letters. she tried to keep it as quiet as possible. there is no proof. because other people said it at the time, one very close friend of hers who was a greek catholic philanthropist, and she became, i think she got hetty to give some money to the church. >> how hard was this to research? >> it was difficult. no diaries, know journals, she wanted no trace of her signature. she was afraid, she was accused in the lawsuit with her aunt's estate of forging her aunt's signatures she was a
business with a very thin margin of process. when you add to that the dramatic changes in technology and the public demand, you have an industry that needs to redefine itself. nobody knows that more than the people sitting on the stage who are here to talk to you about it. you are either going to scramble to survive or take advantage of the unprecedented opportunity. that's what we'll talk about today. each of the panelists are waiting. i still hope that nan talese comes. she was taking the train and should be writing soon. we will see if she does. we will certainly bring her up to 10. and i would like to also give a quick overview of each author's career and their philosophy and how that philosophy has perhaps changed in the course of their career. first up is niko pfund. he joined new york university press in 1990 and wrote to become its director. he began at oxford in the junior position in law and social science of what he wrote to the ranks about the institution to become a tech executive. the cultural nature of human development, the accidental gorilla, peggy pascoe's book on l
after the war and she thought is of the technology offered a parallel examples that the public could understand and this was one of the important promises of "silent spring," drawing a connection between pesticides and this other technology which was this one. [wind blowing] >> that is an animation, that iá not a real explosion. to be able to see it from that á distance it would take eight or es for the sound wave to get to you. if you were far enough away to o see an explosion like that but it illustrates what i am talking about. this is not animation. this is the explosion that occurred on march 1st, 1954, at the king the a tall in the south pacific. this is the first hydrogen bomb. there had actually been one hydrogen device exploded a few months before this. was not practical long. was as big as a building and could not be what urbanized but this was a bomb, this was something that could be put on an airplane and dropped somewhere. this was the castle's brothel test. several things went wrong with this test. the fog was any radioactive fallout would be blown ford and arctic, or
, the technology revolution. and one reason i think that it's really pretty clear that those are key drivers is this is a global phenomenon. and i do sometimes think the american discourse about it tends to be very american. so i'm always quite entertained when i read about, you know, a paper that says rising income inequality in the united states is due to this one particular law passed in the 980s. -- 1980s. okay, then how does that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, h
flight designs and that's why a private company will go to mars, bragging rights over the technology the value of the patents and technology that spins off. >> there was an idea that the government would give an award their first team that gets there, $20 billion or something like that. i'm kind of open-minded happen. been married to any particular idea on space policy. we're watching it evolve before our very eyes and it's going to be interesting to see where it goes over the next few years. >> i'd rather see us explore the ocean bottoms first. we haven't mapped them as well as we have mapped mars. on that note i will wrap up. thank you all for your attendance. have a great afternoon. >> visit booktv.org to watch any of the programs you see here online. type the author or book title in the search bar on the upper left side of the page and check search. book tv streams live online for 48 hours every weekend, with top nonfiction books and authors. booktv.org. >> next. marcus rediker row counts a slave revolt eye board the am a&m amistad. the men were eventually sent to prison in con
about technology is take handheld spirit of free markets are about turning scarcity into abundance that is something government cannot do. 30 years ago the cell phone was the big issue box at about 30, 40 minutes of battery life has $3995. >> you have one? >> no, i use a landline. but the amazing thing is that the government got involved it would still be his biggest issue box, maybe 15 minutes of battery life as $9995 be railing against greedy cell phone makers. so today there's 5 billion in the world. have a cell phone to your banking, medical service. they become handheld computers. so the simple ones are virtually giveaways with the $3995. constant creativity and innovation. just give me one other example, the high-tech example of cell phones. even simple things. you go to a starbucks or similar coffeeshop a 12-ounce, 16-ounce, 20-ounce cups of coffee. he noticed the list at the same size that they don't have three different kinds of inventory? those little things constantly happen in this kind of an economy that's what we seek to preserve. that is morality, little things got a
that owned millvinia but there would be no way to know for sure. 20 first century technology is what helped unravel -- ten years ago i wouldn't have been able to write this book in the way that it is now. >> any more questions? we have a little time left. i just wanted to say something about the book that made me think, but here in texas, looking at its history, particularly the history of slavery and how texas developed, i didn't know but someone shared with me that there was an incentive to have slaves here in texas among regular people because as the land was given away the mexican government giving of land away was based on how many people were in your group. if you could bring slaves, then you would get more land, regular people brought slaves, especially in texas, lots of working-class people came with slaves in order to enhance, are an interesting test about texas itself. regular people and slavery. we have a little more time. if anyone would like to ask a question. okay. would you please move to the mike. >> when i looked at the first lady's great granddad in the new york times and
been bugging him about moral hazard of very technological issue. when he came up to washington, he was a policy wonk too. and that's why the bush institute, i think, has been founded, because president bush has had a curiosity about economics throughout his life x it's benefited us all. basically, what we have to do is just stop doing the wrong things, and there are three things in my chapter that i talk about that we could do to really turn the country around. the first is to get tax policy right, we're not doing it. right now we're the highest corporate tax country in the developed world, we're the third highest on earth. there are two countries that are less friendly for new businesses than the u.s. on earth, that's guyana and the congo. [laughter] but after those two, you know, we're the least friendly place. and i summarize in the chapter a bunch of research that shows if we could just sort of fix the stupid things that we're doing, then you could add about a percent of growth to gdp growth over the next decade, and we're probably starting around 2-3. and then the second thing
nerd. he liked the technological toys of the west. he was in touch with the syrian population. he certainly was not a lackey of the united states, and israel. in fact he was supported of hezbollah, amass, iran, and other groups and states, that had a lot of street credibility in the arab world. so they thought it would pass them over. in fact i know that president bashar had mentioned -- commissioned three studies in february and march before the uprising broke out, and all three said, no, it's not going to happen in syria. so he felt pretty confident. i know for -- i can guarantee you that he was absolutely shocked when the uprising really started to seep into syria, particularly, of course, what lit the fire was the arrest and roughing up of the 15 school age children, teenagers, in the southern city of duras in syria. that touched a nerve. that sort of thing happened in syria quite a bit over the years, but in the new circumstances of the arab spring, and the regime didn't under the new circumstances -- it just grew and grew and grew after that. and it unleashed -- i think this
been enabled by new technology, in the academic realm, the rise of open access models which need to be embraced rather than in impeded especially since they offer a potential solution to the cost problems in the library sector that tom describes which would not necessarily in this on the economic interests of anyone so we need to think very seriously about how we treat voluntary authorship. by the same token the question remains as to whether or not the account of the ecosystem. i love that terminology, that we have heard today, is in fact the constitutionally correct account. i think i must differ slightly from the account that says the original intent of the framers of the constitution who then turned around the year after and enacted the first copyright act was to give something in balance to all of the participants in the system. as far as i can tell, rightly or wrongly those framers had an instrumental vision of copyright which in fact the end user, the consumer, i am happy to say it again, the reader was the ultimate beneficiary of the system and we may dislike that origina
the decision, you will probably reach a different decision about that toxic technology. how it is being produced, letting people make their decisions makes quite a difference. this gets done now. where to produce. of the workers in every enterprise made a decision where to produce, how many would close the factory and move to china? i would guess probably non. close to zero. what of thought, that the workers who had to live with a factory that closes, live in a community that will be affected by factories the close, and workers themselves make the decision. here is another one. for chris decide what to do with the profits, here's an interesting thing we expect. over the last 30 years with boards of directors, we have noticed something i am sure you have all noticed, the boards of directors decided to use the profits they were earning to give enormous increases in the salaries to top executives. we are famous in america for that. thee aratio of one executive ge to an average worker is 300 to 40s all other countries. so we have been in a major part of the ineq0 lity that i talked about be
people but also with all the new technology we could be losing a lot so historians and another 100 years are going to have a rough time. today we seem to be extra cognizant of the impact of the damning letter. i think historically to some extent also, one thing george washington did later in life as he tried to collect, and revise or added some of his earlier letters. george is trying to collect letters to rewrite them to -- jefferson was sometimes right with an i.t. history and perhaps put himself in a favorable light before the event happens of history would review benezet wow jefferson was on the right side of history. when you read washington and jefferson and others ,-com,-com ma it's tough to do. you have to understand, was this really what they meant or were they just lowing small? the same way when you go back to class reunion and if you meet someone and send them in a -- e-mail, you don't tell them they looked horrible look horrible and they look 30 years older than you, do you? congratulations on the new job so we don't know about this, that in the other things i think it's g
or into your office and seizing papers. then as technology changed and the government had the ability to put a electronic device, listen in your house or your office without your knowing it, the court took a little while to get around that. but they finally understood that the principle was the same. now, the major premise is no unreasonable searches and seizures. the minor premise is this thing a search and seizure. and that's, i don't think that gives a judge too much latitude. it's what judges have to do in every case in applying a principle to new circumstances. >> host: when, is there ever a case when a court is justified in a ruling that's not clearly required by the constitution or the clear language of a statute? in your book you seem to suggest that bush v. gore might have been such a bays. such a case. was it? >> guest: no, i don't think so. the concurring opinion by rehnquist, scalia and thomas and so forth was based upon the statute and was preferable to the majority opinion in that respect. but i, you can't say that the judge must only act when the principle is clear because the
of science, technology, engineering and mathematics in europe. >> right. >> incredible. and here's what he says. a very remarkable work is the mechanic and critique of the grange. he is allowed to be the greatest mathematician now living, and his personal worth is equal to his science. the object of his work is to reduce all the principles of mechanics to a single equi-in rum and blah, blah, blah. and then he goes on to apologize for not being able to read it. this would require a calculus degree. >> right. >> and i was a math major, and i had two years of physics. we don't get to la garage in mechanics until the junior or senior year. so now 200 years later, i'm still not up to he grange mechanics, and there is thomas jefferson discoursing on it and understood it. >> right. >> i mean, it's an incredible example of his renaissance qualities. >> right. >> finally, he ended the letter -- >> well, sir, do you have a question? [laughter] >> yes. >> or sorry. >> he, the impact of his views on educating young men and women in this country. >> sure, absolutely. he totally believed that enlightenm
? in the professor's hand there are sheets of paper and now forgotten technology. the professor enters the room. positions herself at the head of the table and asked a student at the papers around. only half a page of type. 165 words. is 165 words on those pages that will grow businesses. those words are nearly incomprehensible. they contain a set of rules you've never heard of before. they contain rules as tenet axioms. every week for the next nine months, you will be told to go out for those starting rules. it is very doable. just like your brainpower, only one in 10 of you will be able to handle it. those who are able to tackle this assignment will monopolize the attention of the girls in the class. girls desperate for help with homework. but what comes next is amazing. in addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, square roots, rational numbers. the entire mathematical system that took you eight years of grammar school and textbooks to learn, yes, the content over 7 pounds worth of paper is hidden in 165 words. prevalent from the beginning of axioms. but how is that? it will come to s
as it sounds, is a lot less common than the past. they are using technology today in ways that are ever more insidious. >> what was your first book experience? you have a second book coming? >> yes, i do have a second book coming. >> congratulations. >> i'm very excited about that. it's a great thing. it's going to be domestic, it's going to involve introduction and a very significant event. in the life of the president, the guy on the 20-dollar bill. an event that everyone learns about in school, but there's a deeper section to it. i'm doing another deep dive just like i did on this one. >> what is the one thing that we all learned in school about andrew jackson? >> the trail of tears. the removal of indians from eastern united states. there's a lot more to that
to remote detonate explosives. they are using technology in ways that are ever more insidious. >> your first book? >> yes. >> what was your experience? to have a second look? >> i just signed a contract the other day. very excited about that. it's a great experience but what's the topic? >> it's going to be a little more domestic. it's going to involve andrew jackson as a really significant event. in the life of the president. the guy on the $20 bill. an event that everybody learns a sense about in school but there's a deeper deeper story to it. so in a way on to another deep dyed just like i did a deep dive on something that i knew a little bit about but realized i wanted to know a lot more. >> what is that one since we all learn in school speak with the trail of tears. about the removal of indians from the eastern united states. there's a lot more to that story. it speaks a lot of ways to the contentiousness of our politics today. >> if the voice you're hearing sounds familiar, that's because it is steve inskeep who is cohost of npr's "morning edition," and author of his first book, "insta
of traditional classroom and digital technology, employing them in a way that flips our traditional model of education. >> by the way, carn appeared on our afterwards program so if you want to watch that author, type in his name. long history between 12 and christopher hitchens. >> long history. we published christopher, "god is not great" in 2007. a number one "new york times" best seller. after that book we published his first memoir, followed last september by an essay collection called "arguably." also went on to be a best seller, but together under extreme circumstances. he was very ill at the time. we hoped to publish a book -- a long are -- longer book about his illness but we corrected the article for vanity fair. >> you're going to be at the miami book fair next week, november 17th, 18th, along with carol blue, and martin amos. >> that's going to be a really interesting panel to be on. martin and christopher knew each other for a very long time. carol and martin are very close mitchell relationship with christopher really dates back to "god is not great" and as my career blossome
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32